Ben Woodeson

ben woodeson

Untitled, Glass and Spring Clamps, 2013

The Belfry is excited to present an exhibition of Ben Woodeson’s work completed during his tenure as Theodore Randall International Chair at Alfred University.

Artist Ben Woodeson makes ephemeral sculptures that deliberately set out to confront both viewer and exhibiting institution. The works are frequently fragile, unstable and kinetic

Born and living in London Woodeson studied at Glasgow School of Art and is the grandson of the German Jewish artist Jack Bilbo. He is currently The Theordore Randall International Chair in Art and Design at Alfred University, New York.

www.woodeson.co.uk

twitter.com/benisdangerous

IMG_9254_treated final

There’s a thin line between love and hate, Glass work stand and ball bearings,2013

 

Ben Woodeson Artist Statement:

Mass, friction, balance, gravity, momentum, potential and kinetic energy; basic rules of physics are exploited to create minimal sculptures that deliberately straddle a line between stability and instability, action and inaction. Poised treacherously, the works are frequently performative in that they inhabit a moment of possible action and subsequent reaction.

Assembled from modular everyday materials and objects, the works keep the viewer poised in a state of slight suspense, challenging them to respond to a unique and evolving environment of cause and effect. Some works are calm, stable and self-contained whilst others confront the viewer with overtly cataclysmic outcomes. The physicality of the works instigates an intense and visceral relationship with the viewer and the surrounding architecture.

The sculptures have the potential to spin, roll, wobble, fall, flick, collapse, shatter and even ignite… but when? The possibility of any actual activity being observed depends purely on chance and patience. The control systems are random and automatic; deliberately set to challenge and tease a viewer’s attention span. Threatened ripples of consequence are sent throughout the sculptures and audience alike. Some have the ability to function repeatedly; others are self-destructive and catastrophic, the resulting debris and detritus subsequently becoming the exhibited work.

Exhibition Photos:

Ben1 Bern17 Ben20 Ben19 Ben18 Ben6Ben15 Ben14Ben11 Ben9 Ben12 Ben8Ben7 Ben5 Ben4 Ben3 Ben2 Ben21